1. Antique Brass Dog Collar With Lock and Key

    Lovely engraved brass dog collar dating from the early part of the 19th Century.

    The collar comes with original lock & key (key doesn’t lock). The engraving is of high quality and reads “John Russell, Milton Campsie” although part of the last word “Campsie” has worn away. Milton Campsie is a historic parish north of Glasgow & it is likely that the collar would’ve belonged to the dog of a wealthy land owner in the area.

    The piece measures roughly 11.5cm diameter and 2cm high (not including lock)

    By the 1900′s working dogs were prized for their breeding value. They were either security guards or working companions, particularly to farmers who relied on them to protect their livestock from attack and hunters who counted on them to retrieve fallen animals during a hunt.

    Oftentimes, dogs would wear collars that contained a lock and only the owner had a key. In the rare event that a dog would turn up missing, or in the more likely event that a dog was stolen, ownership disputes would be settled by who had the key to open the dog’s locking collar.

     

     
  2. Cooling Table Ca: 1860s

    Cooling Table – Ca: 1860s

    Next to the chair, the table is perhaps the oldest form of furniture known to man. With that in mind, most of your run-of-the-mill antique shops in and around town just might have a few nice tables kicking around. They may have a lovely oval butler’s table, an elegant butterfly table, or perhaps even a Queen Anne tea table, but how many shops do you know that have a bona fide cooling table?

    That’s right, a cooling table that comes direct to you right out of the mid 1800s. Creepy you say? We’d happily agree. It wasn’t uncommon for 19th century priests, undertakers and photographers to travel to various homes and provide last rite and photographic services for families who had lost a loved one. The bodies would be laid out on the tables, displayed and photographed. In an effort to preserve and maintain the bodies, ice would be packed under the cooling tables. The model we have for offer is a foldable wooden type, (allowing for easy transport as undertakers, priests and photographers travelled by horses from one home to another to provide this important service those families in mourning).

     
  3. Cooling Table Ca: 1860s

    Cooling Table – Ca: 1860s

    Next to the chair, the table is perhaps the oldest form of furniture known to man. With that in mind, most of your run-of-the-mill antique shops in and around town just might have a few nice tables kicking around. They may have a lovely oval butler’s table, an elegant butterfly table, or perhaps even a Queen Anne tea table, but how many shops do you know that have a bona fide cooling table?

    That’s right, a cooling table that comes direct to you right out of the mid 1800s. Creepy you say? We’d happily agree. It wasn’t uncommon for 19th century priests, undertakers and photographers to travel to various homes and provide last rite and photographic services for families who had lost a loved one. The bodies would be laid out on the tables, displayed and photographed. In an effort to preserve and maintain the bodies, ice would be packed under the cooling tables. The model we have for offer is a foldable wooden type, (allowing for easy transport as undertakers, priests and photographers travelled by horses from one home to another to provide this important service those families in mourning).

     
  4. Cooling Table Ca: 1860s

    Cooling Table – Ca: 1860s

    Next to the chair, the table is perhaps the oldest form of furniture known to man. With that in mind, most of your run-of-the-mill antique shops in and around town just might have a few nice tables kicking around. They may have a lovely oval butler’s table, an elegant butterfly table, or perhaps even a Queen Anne tea table, but how many shops do you know that have a bona fide cooling table?

    That’s right, a cooling table that comes direct to you right out of the mid 1800s. Creepy you say? We’d happily agree. It wasn’t uncommon for 19th century priests, undertakers and photographers to travel to various homes and provide last rite and photographic services for families who had lost a loved one. The bodies would be laid out on the tables, displayed and photographed. In an effort to preserve and maintain the bodies, ice would be packed under the cooling tables. The model we have for offer is a foldable wooden type, (allowing for easy transport as undertakers, priests and photographers travelled by horses from one home to another to provide this important service those families in mourning).

     
  5. Lombroso’s Museum of Criminal Anthropology

    A man creates a museum, and later he becomes a part of that museum himself… on display there at Lombroso Museum in Turin is his own head in a jar. Great psychiatric authority of the nineteenth century, Cesare Lombroso, an Italian who founded the field of criminal anthropology, as it was known.

    Cesear-Lombroso

    Lombroso thought criminality was an inherited trait visible in a person’s features, and in an attempt to prove his theory he collected criminals’ remains for analysis. But now some of the descendants of the offenders – whose body parts were taken without permission – want the bones back.

    In retrospect, it’s hard not to see the great dangers of their approach. Lombroso’s criminal anthropology sought to isolate the “born criminal” as a deviant type of human being—in fact, criminals were outright evolutionary throwbacks in his thinking. That’s why he studied them not just like a separate culture, but a different species.

    For a positivist like Lombroso, science meant mountains of facts; so he obsessively collected not just statistics, but actual objects and anatomical specimens. He amassed an enormous collection of materials, which he destined for a Museum of Psychiatry and Criminology in his native city of Turin.

    Cesear-skulls

    The museum was difficult to access for some years, but recently it reopened in a new location. The collection reveals a maniacal urge to assemble every detail and aspect of criminal life. Besides literal piles of skulls, there are vats of brains, carefully made death masks of murderers, rapists, thieves, and brigands. There are plaster casts of ears showing the degenerate shape characteristic of delinquents and the insane. There are drawings, carvings, poems and songs by criminals, showing their remorseless glory in their evil deeds. There is an impressive collection of prison graffiti, most of it unsuitable for radio. Photos and drawings of prisoners’ tattoos make the argument that criminals are indeed a primitive race; there are even tattooed patches of preserved skin—for every collector knows the value of an original work. And of course, there are murder weapons: daggers, icepicks, cleavers, hatchets, axes, guns, ropes—a whole cornucopia of murder and mayhem.

    modus_operandi

    wife-killer-lomardo

    “Wife Killer” says the label beneath a wax-covered head at the Lombroso Museum. “Murderer” says the label under the head to its left.

    In Lombroso’s view, the face and the crime were inherently linked: he thought delinquency was physically identifiable through telltale physical features. Lombroso’s ideas were discredited, but his research still remains on display in the Turin museum.

    Perhaps every passionate collector yearns to become a part of his collection; Lombroso certainly did. In his will, he left his body to be autopsied by a colleague, so his own skull could be measured and his brain analyzed according to his own theories. His remains were then put in the collection, where still today his whiskered face floats dreamily in a jar.

    lombroso

     
  6. Burleigh Ware Black & White Tureen

    Burleigh Ware black and white (cream) tureen with gilt decoration.

     
  7. Weaved Shell Hat

    Ceremonial tribal shell hat from early to mid 1900′s.

     
  8. Early 1900’s Bone Dagger

    Sacrificial and ceremonial bone dagger.

    Knife itself is 13″ long.

     
  9. Beautiful Wooden Buddha

    Early to mid 20th century Buddha

     
  10. Rice Gods

    The Ifugao Tribe on the island Luzon in the Philippines, use Bulul statues as guardians to protect the rice harvest after a ritual animal sacrifice.
    One stand 18″ and the other 14 1/2″.